Contraceptives after Medical Abortion

This table gives an overview of contraceptive methods, which are described in more detail below. Please note that fertility returns 7 days after medical abortion and most forms of contraception can begin immediately after the procedure.  DAILY PILLS How: Take one pill everyday and take any missed pills as soon as possible. Missing pills risks pregnancy and will make some side effects worse. Side Effects: Changes in bleeding patterns Headaches, dizziness, nausea, breast tenderness, weight change, mood changes, acne (it can improve or worsen, but usually improves) How to use it after a medical abortion: You can use daily pills immediately after medical abortion. Common misunderstandings: Daily pills (or any other contraceptive method) do not strain your body after medical abortion Women lose some blood during abortion, but not too much to stop you from using the daily pills, given that bleeding is a possible side effect Daily pills do not build up hormones in a woman’s body. Women do not need a “rest” from taking daily pills Must be taken everyday whether or not you are having sex Do not make women infertile after they stop taking it Do not cause birth defects or multiple births Do not change women’s sexual behaviour   3 MONTH INJECTION: How: It is given by injection into the muscle. The hormone is then released slowly into the bloodstream. Side effects: Changes in monthly bleeding First 3 months (irregular bleeding or prolonged bleeding) At one year (no monthly bleeding or infrequent bleeding) Weight gain, dizziness, headaches, abdominal bloating, mood changes, less sex drive How to use it after a medical abortion: You can receive the injection immediately after medical abortion. Correcting misunderstandings: The injection (or any other contraceptive method) does not strain your body after abortion Can stop monthly bleeding (but this is not harmful, and could prevent anaemia) Blood is not building up inside the woman Does not disrupt an existing pregnancy Does not make women infertile ARM IMPLANTS: Types of implants: Jadelle: 2 rods containing levonorgestrel, highly effective for 5 years. Implanon NXT: 1 rod containing etonogestrel, labeled for upto 3 years of use. Levoplant: 2 rods containing levonorgestrel, highly effective for 4 years. How: A specifically trained provider performs a minor surgical procedure to place one or 2 rods under the skin. You do not need to take any further action after the placement of the rods. Side Effects: Changes in bleeding patterns (lighter bleeding, prolonged bleeding, irregular bleeding, infrequent bleeding, no monthly bleeding). If this is bothersome, contact your pharmacist or CHV. Headaches, Abdominal pain, Acne (which can improve or worsen), Weight change, Breast tenderness, Dizziness, Mood changes, Nausea How to use it after an abortion: You can use an arm implant immediately after a medical abortion. Correcting misunderstandings: Implants do not work once they are removed Their hormones do not remain in a woman’s body They do not cause any harm if they stop monthly bleeding Blood does not build up inside the woman They do not make women infertile COPPER-BEARING

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Call for applications to join the Youth Can! Advocacy Training Programme in Kenya and Tanzania

DSW has announced a call for applications to join the Youth Can! training programme on advocacy for Family Planning and Reproductive Health. They are seeking applications from local youth-focused (with a special focus on youth-led) CSOs in Kenya and Tanzania by 15 October 2017. The capacity development workshops will take place between March and June 2018, following an in-depth preparation phase, including organisational advocacy capacity assessments and development of tailored training curricula based on these findings. Find more information about this at this link: http://www.dsw.org/en/2017/09/youthcan-call-applications-join-youth-can-advocacy-training-programme-kenya/

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Nimechanuka relaunched!

On 7th September 2017 the Nimechanuka website was relaunched with a new set of information and story contributors! But what do we know about the website Nimechanuka? We took a moment to discuss this with the website manager. Tell us about Nimechanuka. When was it formed and by who? Nimechanuka is an online community and platform where we are involved in providing relevant sexual information to Kenyan youth hence  influencing responsible sexual behaviour. Apart from that we also advocate for sexual reproductive health rights of youth and adolescents. We strongly believe sexual reproductive health rights are human rights which should be respected, guaranteed and protected by the government going forward. Nimechanuka was formed by Ipas Africa Alliance, in the year 2013. What triggered its formation? Nimechanuka was borne by the need to fill the gap that was present on the  social media scene, whereby many youths and adolescents lacked comprehensive relevant and timely information about sexuality, contraceptive usage and general sexual reproductive health content that one can currently access on our platforms both on Facebook page; Nimechanuka , twitter handle @Nimechanuka and  our website www. nimechanuka.co.ke What does the Nimechanuka platform do? We are heavily involved in advocacy activities on our social media platforms. Our core areas include sexual reproductive health rights, teenage pregnancy, unsafe abortions and gender issues. Also through our partner Aunty Jane Hotline we provide counselling services through a toll free number. What would you term as some of your greatest tangible achievements? Our greatest achievement so far has been providing the interface for many youth to get relevant information on sexuality, contraceptive usage and knowledge on their sexual reproductive health rights as per the Kenyan Constitution and other international documents to which Kenya is signatory e.g. the Maputo Protocol. Also we have been able to spur debates on topics which the society considers taboos to address but are relevant in this day and age, because they affect quite a huge number of young people e.g. teen pregnancies and unsafe abortion, contraceptives access especially to adolescents. You have a very vibrant online platform/website. How many people are in your network and how do they benefit? Social media is an integral part of young people in Kenya, giving them a way to communicate, connect and learn on their own terms. We harness this opportunity to provide information, interact and inquire pertinent issues affecting their sexuality hence tailoring our messages to suit them.  Our vibrancy is attributed to the way we deliver our messages, incorporating Sheng, English and Kiswahili hence interacting with them on their level. Currently we have an audience of about 3,000 people on our platforms and its still growing. What is new about the Nimechanuka website after the relaunch? We had discussions with students and young people from the Universities and communities about what they would like to see on the website. We now have a live chat section, a section on sexual reproductive rights, frequently asked questions on contraceptives, blog posts and even job opportunities! We know that

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